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Hansa Medical receives SEK 3.4 million grant from VINNOVA to carry out Phase II study with IdeS

Regulatory information
Hansa Medical has been granted SEK 3.4 million to perform a Phase II-study with the drug candidate IdeS. The grant has been provided within VINNOVA’s (Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems) Forska&Väx-programme (Research & Growth Programme). VINNOVA states: ”IdeS at kidney transplantation, is a project incorporating high-level competence with strong clinical support within a field of significant medical need”.

”We are very pleased of VINNOVA’s strong support. The SEK 3.4 million will cover the costs of significant parts of seeing IdeS through a Phase II-study. This study will involve patients with renal failure, now waiting for kidney transplantation at Uppsala University Hospital. We seek to file a Phase II application with the Swedish Medical Products Agency subsequent to reporting the results from our on-going Phase I study. Results can be expected to be published in the beginning of 2014,” states Emanuel Björne, CEO of Hansa Medical AB.

VINNOVA Forska & Väx
VINNOVA received 333 applications mounting to a net worth of SEK 410 million. The Forska&Väx-programme targets companies from all industries demonstrating significant potential as to growth and development. Applicants need to showcase a viable international demand for their submitted project, demonstrate its ability to generate growth of the company and its potential to prompt new or better products, services, and processes.
 

IdeS enables transplantation
Hansa Medical is developing the drug candidate IdeS for treatment in conjunction with kidney transplantation. IdeS is an enzyme targeting and inactivating IgG-antibodies. In a healthy individual, IgG-antibodies constitute a well functioning part of the immune system. However, in several medical conditions IgG-antibodies can cause problems.


For 15 % of patients waiting for kidney transplantation, so-called donor specific antibodies (antibodies hostile to potential donor organ) constitute an immediate barrier for transplantation. Today, there are no efficient methods to reduce antibody levels prior to transplantation. Consequently, these patients rarely, if ever, qualify to be transplanted. Instead, they are referred to years in dialysis, associated with increased risk of infections, cardiovascular diseases and significantly shortened life expectancy.

The drug candidate IdeS carries the potential to become the primary treatment method facilitating transplantation for this group of patients. Estimated market potential point to SEK 1 billion per year in the U.S. and Europe alone.